For nine months, the Crocker family lived in a cabin deep in the Yukon wilderness. They were 175 km from the nearest town, surviving off picked berries and a storage of non-perishable foods in a place where the temperature drops to 40 degrees below zero. The family of 5, which includes three kids aged 10, 8, and 4, also had no access electricity, running water, clocks, or watches. This is how people did it before Ben Franklin’s kite got zapped and binging became synonymous with Netflix. You’re probably terrified right now — but their kids? They loved every minute of it.

The purpose of the getaway was ostensibly so the family could press reset on their lives, get back to a simpler, natural existence, and — most importantly — connect with one another again. Was it easy? F–k no. But the experience seemed to have the intended effect on the kids. Suzanne Crocker captured her family’s journey in what would become the documentary All The Time In The World. It’s a testament to the transformative power of not having any power. Below she talks about the good it did her family, and how even parents who are constantly paired to their phone can follow in their footsteps.

Kids Become More Self-Sufficient Than You Can Imagine

When you live out in the woods, kids have no choice buy to pull their own weight. Suzanne says that once they were free from restraints or boundaries, hers easily took to that Oregon Trail life.

“The kids were just an integral part of life in the bush,” she says. Suzanne and her husband trusted them to chop wood, drive the Ski-Doo, haul water from the river, peel logs, and start fires. They used axes and knives and even helped stitch up their wounded father (sorry Dad). In fact, the only thing the kids didn’t touch was the chainsaw.

Granted, her children were well-taught (both parents are former doctors and experienced outdoorsmen) but when they were on their own, the kids never hurt themselves. Plus, the lack of distractions offered ample time to practice and focus on the arduous tasks. There’s less chance of chopping off a limb when you aren’t scrolling through Instagram at the same time.

MORE: What It Was Like to Grow Up Completely Off the Grid

Mayra Rodriguez
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Mayra Rodriguez

Content Editor at oneQube
Work from home mom dedicated to my family. Total foodie trying new recipes.Love hunting for the best deals online. Wannabe style fashionista. As content editor, I get to do what I love everyday. Tweet, share and promote the best content our tools find on a daily basis.
Mayra Rodriguez
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