A California case will make its way up to the national level as groups argue against giving women accurate abortion and contraception information. In the National Institute of Family and Life Advocates (NIFLA) v. Becerra case, the Supreme Court will decide if so-called “Crisis Pregnancy Centers” (CPCs) have to give women all of their options, including abortion. If the SCOTUS strikes down current state law — which requires CPCs to provide women with information about abortions — such a decision could affect not just California, but the rest of the country, too.

According to Slate, CPCs “often open their doors near abortion clinics and advertise to pregnant women in need of medical help. But, as the publication noted, “they offer very limited services — sometimes, no actual medical services at all — and espouse anti-abortion information in an attempt to counsel women out of terminating their pregnancies.” Therefore, when pregnant women think that they’re attending an appointment with a medical clinic to discuss possible options, they instead are just scheduled for a meeting with a non-medically licensed counselor.

To combat this misleading practice, according to NPR, existing California law insists that CPCs post the following notice within their facilities, sharing the prevalence of family planning tools and offering a phone number to call if need be:

Abortion foes’ latest Supreme Court challenge could turn out very, very badly for them: https://t.co/mvunVIAtC8 pic.twitter.com/gT3uXuUDku

— Slate (@Slate) November 13, 2017

Also, as Reuters reported, if a CPCs are unlicensed, it must state so publicly, notifying visitors:

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Mayra Rodriguez

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