Infertility can be caused by a number of factors, both internal and external. Doctors have been able to pinpoint certain behaviors and preconditions that likely up infertility risk, but, scarily enough, a lot of them are unavoidable. A recent study even revealed that pollution may be keeping you from getting pregnant, which could account for the uptick in infertility issues over the past few decades. These effects are long-lasting, and researchers have made it their mission to get to the bottom of things.

By and large, fertility rates are falling in the United States. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention shares that 6 percent of married women in the United States, ages 15 to 44, have infertility issues lasting through a year of trying. Twelve percent of that same demographic (but regardless of marital status) also has “difficulty getting pregnant or carrying a pregnancy to term.” Many couples turn to in vitro fertilization (IVF) as a solution, but it’s nowhere near 100 percent effective, and pollutants appear to be a significant reason why.

In a study published in Reproductive Toxicology, researchers from…

Mayra Rodriguez
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Mayra Rodriguez

Content Editor at oneQube
Work from home mom dedicated to my family. Total foodie trying new recipes.Love hunting for the best deals online. Wannabe style fashionista. As content editor, I get to do what I love everyday. Tweet, share and promote the best content our tools find on a daily basis.
Mayra Rodriguez
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