We’ve partnered with our friends at Monti Kids to empower families at home with the leading infant toddler curriculum: Montessori.

While many families don’t become aware of Montessori until their children are school-aged, there are many benefits of using the Montessori philosophy at home, starting from birth.

The first three years of a child’s life are arguably the most important in terms of development. “Eighty-five percent of the brain is formed by age three and these earliest years lay the foundation for all future learning,” says Zahra Kassam, an internationally trained Montessori teacher and the founder of Monti Kids.

This is the time when children develop their sense of self and their sense of their place in the world. We want our children to emerge from infancy and toddlerhood feeling confident, independent and supported, and the Montessori approach can help parents achieve just that.

While using Montessori at home might sound daunting, especially in the already overwhelming time of welcoming a new baby into your family, there are a few very simple things you can do to begin using Montessori from birth and Monti Kids can make it even simpler.

Here’s how to get started:

1. Create a development-centered nursery

Maria Montessori wrote that children three and under have an “unconscious absorbent mind.” Babies do not need to consciously try to learn new things as they already absorb everything around them. Their environment becomes a part of who they are.

Because of the enormous impact of a baby’s environment, it’s important to put some thought into designing a room for them that isn’t just cute, but supports them developmentally. Montessori nurseries are simple, orderly and aesthetically pleasing. They are beautiful, but also calm with plenty of open space and, ideally, natural light.

Two things that are done a little differently in a Montessori nursery are the sleeping area and the baby’s play area: Many Montessori families opt for a floor bed rather than a crib—this can be as simple as a low firm mattress on the floor, although bed frames for floor beds are also available. This allows the baby to see their whole room with an unobstructed view and gives them the ability to get in and out of bed on their own once they start to crawl.

A baby’s play space can simply be a simple rug or mat on the floor. You will often find a mirror on the wall as even young infants seem mesmerized by their own reflections. A mobile is generally hung above the baby’s play area.

There is a specific progression of Montessori mobiles designed to follow newborns’ developmental needs, progressing from simple black and white images to different shades of the same color as baby develops. A program like Monti Kids includes these beautiful mobiles in its Level 1 materials, as well as informative articles and videos to help you set up the ideal play space for your infant.

Montessori nurseries also use a low shelf to store baby’s toys. This way, the baby can see the toys and become intrigued. They will eventually learn to roll, scoot, or crawl over and select a toy from the shelf on their own. Putting things within a child’s reach is one of the ways that Montessori encourages independence, from birth all the way through school.

2. Communicate thoughtfully

From birth, infants are absorbing language. The way we communicate with our infants can have a real impact on their language development, as well as how they perceive themselves. There are a few things Montessori parents and teachers do differently when it comes…

Mayra Rodriguez
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Mayra Rodriguez

Content Editor at oneQube
Work from home mom dedicated to my family. Total foodie trying new recipes.Love hunting for the best deals online. Wannabe style fashionista. As content editor, I get to do what I love everyday. Tweet, share and promote the best content our tools find on a daily basis.
Mayra Rodriguez
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