Positive relationships create healthy children and adolescents.

Shutterstock

A new study by the National Institutes of Health has determined that early family experience affects later romantic relationships. The study didn’t just look at straight or gay families – it drew conclusions from all families.

The NIH study found that young adults who were raised in a positive family climate with effective parenting were more likely to have healthy romantic relationships. Also, the findings give insights into how parenting techniques affect children’s interpersonal skills later in life.

Learning how to form and sustain happy and healthy romantic relationships is a key skill for young adults – regardless of whether or not their parents are LGBTQ. Such relationships are based on feelings of love, effective problem-solving, and the absence of physical and verbal violence.

The ability to develop a healthy relationship can be influenced by the experiences people have had within their own families. However, the ways in which the family environment influences interpersonal skills and romantic relationships aren’t well understood.

The team of researchers was led by Penn State graduate student Mengya Xia. The multi-year study focused on preventing substance use among more than 10,000 youths in rural and semi-rural communities in Pennsylvania and Iowa.

A randomly selected set of nearly 2,000 people participated in a later follow-up project when they were young adults. For this analysis, the team included the 974 participants between 18 and 21 years old who were…

Mayra Rodriguez
Follow Me

Mayra Rodriguez

Content Editor at oneQube
Work from home mom dedicated to my family. Total foodie trying new recipes.Love hunting for the best deals online. Wannabe style fashionista. As content editor, I get to do what I love everyday. Tweet, share and promote the best content our tools find on a daily basis.
Mayra Rodriguez
Follow Me