Grief and loss are a normal part of life. But mourning the death of a child is certainly not. Studies have shown that, when a parent’s worst fears are realized, the psychological and physical damage can be more intense than perhaps any other grief response. It makes sense. The loss of a child is the loss of promise, potential. A cruel violation of the natural order.

One detailed study of how parents cope in the aftermath, published in 2008, surveyed 449 parents who had lost a child to cancer 4 to 9 years earlier. They found that, while both mothers and fathers healed over time, about 20 percent still reported unresolved grief even a decade after the loss. The findings also suggest that mothers and fathers, while both bereft, grieve differently. Mothers were more likely to display low psychological and physical well-being overall. Fathers were more likely to report low quality of life, difficulty sleeping, and nightmares.

Here’s the data behind these conclusions:

How Long Does It Take For Parents To Heal?

For the study, researchers asked each parent one simple question: “Do you think that you have worked through your grief?” Four to nine years after the loss of a child, 26 percent of parents (116 participants) reported that their grief remained “unresolved”, and these parents became the focus of the study….

Mayra Rodriguez
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Mayra Rodriguez

Content Editor at oneQube
Work from home mom dedicated to my family. Total foodie trying new recipes.Love hunting for the best deals online. Wannabe style fashionista. As content editor, I get to do what I love everyday. Tweet, share and promote the best content our tools find on a daily basis.
Mayra Rodriguez
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