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University of Pennsylvania’s campus, Philadelphia, PA, Friday, Sept. 8, 2017.

Alison Malmon was wrapping up the end of her freshman year at the University of Pennsylvania in 2000 when she got the news: Her older brother Brian, a student at Columbia University, killed himself.

He’d struggled for years with mental illness, Malmon said, but concealed his symptoms. Determined to help, Malmon formed a group at Penn a year-and-a-half later to empower students to talk openly about mental health. Her group, Active Minds, blossomed into a national organization that today has more than 450 campus chapters. Leaders with the organization spend their time planning programming and talking with college students about the now well-documented pressure today’s young people face.

“What you hear often is just a need to be perfect,” said Malmon, now the group’s executive director, “and a need to present oneself as perfect.”

A new study out of the U.K. shows just that — today’s college students want to be perfect, and more so than their parents did. But the reasons behind that, the researchers say, are deeply ingrained in today’s culture.

Two British researchers studied more than 40,000 students from the United States, Canada and Great Britain in what they believe is the first study examining perfectionism across multiple generations. They found that what they called “socially-prescribed perfectionism” increased by a third between 1989 (when Gen Xers attended college) and 2016 (with a mix of millennials and Gen Zers), and that culture could be driving up rates of mental-health disorders.

Lead researcher Thomas Curran said that while so many of today’s young people try to curate a perfect life on Instagram, social media’s grip isn’t the only reason for perfectionist tendencies. Instead, he said, it may be driven by competition percolating more into modern society, meaning young people can’t avoid being sorted and ranked in education and employment. That comes from new norms…

Mayra Rodriguez
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Mayra Rodriguez

Content Editor at oneQube
Work from home mom dedicated to my family. Total foodie trying new recipes.Love hunting for the best deals online. Wannabe style fashionista. As content editor, I get to do what I love everyday. Tweet, share and promote the best content our tools find on a daily basis.
Mayra Rodriguez
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