William “Rick” Singer leaves Boston Federal Court after being charged with racketeering conspiracy, money laundering conspiracy, conspiracy to defraud the United States, and obstruction of justice.

When Eva McGregor Dodds, a Detroit-area based college counselor, meets with high-school kids and parents, she hears the same fears and concerns regarding their children’s future. Parents, of course, want the best for their kids.

But she has also observed something less wholesome. Parents, she said, want their kids to get into the best schools possible, not just so they can get the highest quality education. “It’s so the parents can brag,” she said.

The 204-page arrest complaint was filled with recordings of parents seeking assurances of top scores from paid test takers and acceptance letters.

Federal prosecutors dropped a bombshell indictment on Tuesday, accusing parents of paying $25 million in bribes to get their often unknowing kids into top schools, shocked many. Defendants include parents from the world of law, business and entertainment.

William “Rick” Singer, a college-admissions consultant at the center of the case who secretly taped many of his conversations with parents, “preyed on the fact parents can’t stand to see their kids not get what they want,” Dodds said. “This is a culture where no doesn’t mean no.”

The 204-page arrest complaint was filled with recordings of parents seeking assurances of top scores from paid test takers and acceptance letters.

The case has revealed the dark side of helicopter parenting, the cultural forces and status anxiety that fuel such risky gambles, experts say.

From controversies over a family’s unsupervised backyard fun to following your children to work, some observers have said such hands-on parenting is becoming increasingly extreme.

But the latest controversy has taken helicopter parenting to the extreme. Many of the parents named in court papers wanted their children to believe they tested strongly in college entrance exams. One child even took at fake college admissions exam at home.

Many of the parents named in court papers wanted their children to believe they tested strongly in college entrance exams.

Helicopter parenting is defined as a form of parenting where children overprotect their children. However, some studies have shown that children with over-controlling parents may later struggle to adjust in school and social…

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Mayra Rodriguez

Content Editor at oneQube
Work from home mom dedicated to my family. Total foodie trying new recipes.Love hunting for the best deals online. Wannabe style fashionista. As content editor, I get to do what I love everyday. Tweet, share and promote the best content our tools find on a daily basis.
Mayra Rodriguez
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