Cancer begins with a single cell, but quickly expands to affect every facet of life, even after remission. Emotional trauma, missed school days, and loss of fertility are only a few of the ways that cancer lingers long after the fact, leading survivors to ask, “Can I get pregnant if I had cancer as a child? Or does the treatment that saved my life prevent me from having children of my own?”

“We talk about how child cancer survival rates are over 80 percent — four decades ago most of these children would not survive, but now we know they will,” notes Dr. Asma Javed, M.B.B.S, of The Mayo Clinic Fertility Preservation Program, part of The Mayo Clinic Children’s Center, in an interview with Romper. And this statistic, while deeply encouraging, puts fertility front and center. Javed explains:

While chemotherapy and radiation treatments absolutely deal devastating blows to the reproductive system, new evidence suggests the fertility of childhood cancer survivors might be more resilient than previously thought, according to The New York Times. In fact, a large study in The Lancet Oncology recently showed 64 percent of ex-cancer patients who sought fertility treatment as adults became pregnant. It’s a promising statistic, and the study…

Mayra Rodriguez
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Mayra Rodriguez

Content Editor at oneQube
Work from home mom dedicated to my family. Total foodie trying new recipes.Love hunting for the best deals online. Wannabe style fashionista. As content editor, I get to do what I love everyday. Tweet, share and promote the best content our tools find on a daily basis.
Mayra Rodriguez
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